Do You Need a Knee Arthroscopy?

Developments in the Treatment of Degenerative Knee Arthritis & Meniscal Tears For many years knee arthroscopy has been used for patients with persistent knee pain, instability due to a torn meniscus, debridement (removal of loose bodies within the knee) and for diagnostic purposes. It was considered a good option as it was keyhole surgery, thus reducing the risk of infection and speeding up post-operative recovery. Previously arthroscopy was an open procedure, involving a larger incision and an elongated recovery period. However, recent clinical trials have studied patient recovery times and outcomes when treating degenerative meniscus tears with arthroscopy versus a combination of physiotherapy and exercise (Brignardello-Peterson, Guyatt BMJ 2017 – see link below for more details). The conclusion was that knee arthroscopy was not the most effective treatment. Also, a large trial in 2016 found there was no further benefit from arthroscopy compared to a programme of physiotherapy and exercise over a 12-month review period. Here at The Iveson Clinic, when a patient presents with an arthritic knee or cartilage degeneration, we would start with a detailed assessment and examination of the knee. We would also observe the patient’s general posture, particularly with regard to foot alignment. Findings are then discussed with the patient and a treatment plan is made. Advice includes avoiding kneeling, twisting on a stationary foot, squatting or any activity that aggravates the condition. If the knee is warm, swollen and inflamed, treatment is offered to aid recovery such as ice, acupuncture and soft tissue massage. The patient will also be offered a personalised, graduated exercise programme to strengthen the muscles supporting the knee joint. With compliance to the treatment and the home...

Back To Health

As we all start to enjoy longer days and increased levels of activities, there is a tendency to overdo things and thus suffer with increased levels of back pain. The AACP (Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists), recommends the use of acupuncture as a treatment for patients with low back pain. Our physiotherapists at the Iveson Clinic, may often use this treatment in conjunction with ‘hand’s on’ treatment, advice and exercise.  Acupuncture treatment is especially cost effective when it is delivered by a physiotherapist as part of the management plan. Evidence concludes that acupuncture will assist in reducing low back pain. With less pain, back exercises can be engaged more rapidly. Acupuncture may also mean less analgesic medication is required. Acupuncture works by stimulating the brain and central nervous system to release natural pain relieving hormones , such as Endorphin.  The affects of acupuncture treatment can last up to six months and result in a reduction of pain and thus an improved quality of life....

A Warm Welcome to a New Colleague

We are pleased to welcome a new colleague to the Iveson Clinic team. Physiotherapist Laura Palmer joined us recently and will be working at the clinic on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, as well as offering home visits. Laura qualified as a Chartered Physiotherapist in 2007; she worked for the NHS for the first five years of her career, in different areas including elderly care, respiratory, neurology and musculoskeletal. Since then Laura has worked in a private practice, specialising in musculoskeletal problems and sports injuries. She is also qualified in acupuncture and aquatic physiotherapist and has a keen interest in knee injuries. When she is not busy working, Laura enjoys spending time with her husband and their young daughter....

I Like to Move It, Move It!

How active are you? Do you exercise regularly or do you feel you could do more? Physiotherapists recommend 30 minutes of exercise at a moderate intensity, five times a week. Don’t worry if you aren’t keen on joining a gym or exercise class though; it’s easier than you think to incorporate activity into your day. From vacuuming to walking to digging in the garden and dancing – anything that gets you moving and increases your heart rate counts! Take it gently at first and build up your pace and duration gradually. Don’t be tempted to overdo it. Walking: take a brisk walk for as long as you can – 30 minutes is a good target to work towards. Maybe get off the bus a stop or two early and walk to rest of the way Dancing: turn up your favourite tunes and dance around your home! At work: take the stairs instead of the lift and do some desk-based stretches and exercises Housework: turn chores into a workout by speeding them up or being more energetic. Try vacuuming or cleaning the bathroom with music on, to make it more enjoyable Physical activity makes us feel good, keeps us mobile and can help ward off illness, aches and pains. So get up, get out there and move it, move it!...

Back in the Garden

Although we are still in the depths of winter, signs of spring are beginning to appear, with bulbs emerging from the soil and buds forming on the trees. For many of us, with spring comes the urge to get back in the garden. However, as well as resulting in beautifully borders, gardening can also cause aches, pains and strains, especially in the lower back and shoulders. Some new research has just been published by Coventry University, along with the Royal Horticultural Society, which used some innovative techniques more usually found on the set of a Hollywood blockbuster than a research lab. The aim was to discover how best to prevent or minimise the damage that can be done by gardening. The team at the university used ‘motion capture’ (the technique used to create life-like characters such as Gollum in Lord of the Rings films) to record exactly how the body moves when digging. A computer programme then created an animated 3-D model of the human skeleton, major joints and muscles associated with movement, enabling the researchers to study the wear and strain on the body. The top tips to emerge from the research were: When digging, use a regular, repetitive technique rather than erratic movements Bend with your knees rather than your back where possible Avoid reaching, bending or stretching forwards. Instead work with your spade or fork close to your body Try not to twist as you dig or lift. Turn your whole body instead You can read more about the research here This clip from BBC Breakfast News shows how it was done: How Hollywood can help reduce your...

Acupuncture to Alleviate Pain

Acupuncture is one of the oldest recorded forms of medicine, having been used for over 3000 years by the Chinese. Modern scientific research shows that acupuncture stimulates the brain to produce natural chemicals called endorphins,which aid pain relief and help the body heal itself. A recent study* in Australia has shown acupuncture to be an effective alternative to pain medications for some emergency department patients, producing better results than pain relief drugs alone. The research involved 528 patients, making it the world’s largest randomized, controlled trial of acupuncture in an emergency department. The study looked at patients with acute low back pain, migraines and ankle sprains. Patients who reported their level of pain to be at least 4 out of 10 were given either acupuncture alone, acupuncture combined with pain relief medication, or medication alone. Interestingly, more patients in the acupuncture-only group said they would probably or definitely repeat their treatment compared to those in the combined group or the pain relief medication-alone group. Lead investigator for the study Marc Cohen, MBBS, PhD, a professor in the School of Health & Biomedical Sciences at RMIT University in Melbourne, said of the results “Emergency nurses and doctors need a variety of pain-relieving options for patients, given the concerns around opioids such as morphine, which carry the risk of addiction when used long-term.” Acupuncture is available at The Iveson Clinic, and many of our patients report great results after having it. If you would like more information or to make an appointment, please give us a call on 01787 374964. * Cohen MM, Smit DV, Andrianopoulos N, et al. ‘Acupuncture for analgesia in...