Hip Arthroscopy… A Hot Topic

  Since the news of Andy Murray’s forthcoming retirement, and the revelation that he hasn’t made a full and pain-free recovery from his hip surgery, we felt it would be helpful to explain a little about the procedure he underwent – the hip arthroscopy. This topic is of particular interest to Julie Iveson, head physiotherapist and proprietor of The Iveson Clinic, who used to be an international gymnast underwent the same operation on her hips, five and eight years ago. Hip arthroscopy is generally considered for patients below the age of 40 who have damaged their hip joint and possibly the soft tissue around and within it. This damage often occurs in elite athletes whose hips can be affected by repetitive physical exercise over a long period of time.  The hip joint is a ball and socket joint, held tightly together by muscles, ligaments and suction. Hip arthroscopy is commonly performed for a condition called Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI), where there may be some catching or pinching of the ball and socket joint due to additional bone which can develop on the ball or the rim of the socket which is termed Cam or Pincer impingement.  Due to its deep-seated nature within the body, the hip is not the easiest joint to perform keyhole surgery on. During the procedure, various portholes are inserted as well as a camera, which enables the surgeon to view the area on a screen and thus enable the reparative surgery to proceed.  This may include removing excess bone spurs (i.e. Cam), repairing torn labrum, removing loose bodies and so on. Hip arthroscopy is not a simple process and takes...

Seasons Greetings!

We would like to wish all our clients a Merry Christmas and a Happy, Healthy 2019 Christmas Opening Hours                                              Monday 24th – 9am to 1pm Tuesday 25th & Wednesday 26th – CLOSED                  Thursday 27th – 9am to 5pm Friday 28th – 9am to 5pm  Monday 31st – 9am to 5pm Tuesday 1st Jan – CLOSED                                                                                                               Open as usual from Wednesday 2nd January                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         ...

My Back Pain Has Gone – Now What?

Non-specific low back pain is one of the most common – and costly – healthcare problems in this country. This type of back pain typically recurs and has a huge impact on individual sufferers through time off work, poor sleep, reduced physical activity, increased use of pain medication, and on society as a whole through lost work days, GP appointments and so on. Chiropractors generally treat low back pain with gentle spinal manipulation and mobilisation techniques, backed up with the use of exercises. Many studies show that, for many people, this is the most effective approach. However, non-specific low back pain is a complex, multi-faceted problem, which encompasses social, behavioural and psychological factors, and there is little evidence about how best to prevent the pain from returning.  Many chiropractors use one of two strategies once a patient has recovered from their low back pain: to finish treatment and possibly continue with exercises, and only have further treatment when the pain returns (this is known as symptom-guided treatment) or to go on to a maintenance care programme. This involves regular treatment sessions at three, four or even six-monthly intervals to remove any areas of spinal dysfunction as they are found and before they become symptomatic. This is a common approach used by chiropractors and one which, anecdotally, seems to work for many people, although there has been no quality research on it until now. A recent Swedish study looked at a group of over 300 patients with non-specific low back pain who responded well to chiropractic care. They were then either left to return for treatment if and when their pain returned, or they...

Dizziness

Do you suffer from a whirling, spinning or dizziness feeling? If so you are not alone, it is reported that up to 50% of adults will experience dizziness at some point. There are many causes for dizziness, one of these is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which is a condition of the inner ear. We can assess for this using the Hallpike-Dix test. This helps us to determine if your inner ear is the cause of the dizziness. If this is the case then the Epley Manoeuvre can be simply performed by our trained health professional. In most cases this quickly resolves the symptoms. Commonly, with BPPV, people will complain of dizziness when turning over in bed, looking up, looking down or laying down. This spinning feeling may be accompanied with nausea/vomiting and falling. Here at the Iveson Clinic we are proud to have health professionals fully trained in the assessment and treatment of BPPV. Call to make your appointment today on 01787...

I Like to Move It, Move It!

How active are you? Do you exercise regularly or do you feel you could do more? Physiotherapists recommend 30 minutes of exercise at a moderate intensity, five times a week. Don’t worry if you aren’t keen on joining a gym or exercise class though; it’s easier than you think to incorporate activity into your day. From vacuuming to walking to digging in the garden and dancing – anything that gets you moving and increases your heart rate counts! Take it gently at first and build up your pace and duration gradually. Don’t be tempted to overdo it. Walking: take a brisk walk for as long as you can – 30 minutes is a good target to work towards. Maybe get off the bus a stop or two early and walk to rest of the way Dancing: turn up your favourite tunes and dance around your home! At work: take the stairs instead of the lift and do some desk-based stretches and exercises Housework: turn chores into a workout by speeding them up or being more energetic. Try vacuuming or cleaning the bathroom with music on, to make it more enjoyable Physical activity makes us feel good, keeps us mobile and can help ward off illness, aches and pains. So get up, get out there and move it, move it!...

Ice, Ice, Baby!

With temperatures set to plummet this week, we may well see some ice and snow again. Slippery surfaces can be hazardous and many injuries are caused by falling or slipping on ice. However, with a little bit of preparation and care, accidents can hopefully be avoided. Here are some useful tips from the British Chiropractic Association to keep you safe & sound in the wintery weather: FOOTWEAR Wear waterproof shoes with thermal socks or insoles. This will help keep your feet warm. Cold, numb feet are less able to sense and adapt to changing conditions. Footwear should have a solid raised tread on the sole to maximise your grip. Or you can attach ‘ice grippers’ to your shoes, which have studs to help give a sure footing on the ice. Shoes or boots should be supportive, with firm ankle support to prevent you ‘going over’ on your ankle and help you feel more stable in slippery conditions.  If shoes have laces, they should be firmly laced to give a close fit without limiting the circulation. What to avoid: Wellingtons can be practical and keep your feet dry, but they often don’t give enough support and have poor grip. Also avoid walking outside in leather or other smooth-soled shoes. CLOTHING Clothing should be warm and allow you to move freely. Anything that impedes you from walking ‘normally’ could make you more prone to falling over or lead to you walking in an unnatural way. Layers will help keep you cosy Keep your extremities warm with a hat and gloves PREPARATION Build up your balance and stability at home by standing...