Hip Arthroscopy… A Hot Topic

  Since the news of Andy Murray’s forthcoming retirement, and the revelation that he hasn’t made a full and pain-free recovery from his hip surgery, we felt it would be helpful to explain a little about the procedure he underwent – the hip arthroscopy. This topic is of particular interest to Julie Iveson, head physiotherapist and proprietor of The Iveson Clinic, who used to be an international gymnast underwent the same operation on her hips, five and eight years ago. Hip arthroscopy is generally considered for patients below the age of 40 who have damaged their hip joint and possibly the soft tissue around and within it. This damage often occurs in elite athletes whose hips can be affected by repetitive physical exercise over a long period of time.  The hip joint is a ball and socket joint, held tightly together by muscles, ligaments and suction. Hip arthroscopy is commonly performed for a condition called Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI), where there may be some catching or pinching of the ball and socket joint due to additional bone which can develop on the ball or the rim of the socket which is termed Cam or Pincer impingement.  Due to its deep-seated nature within the body, the hip is not the easiest joint to perform keyhole surgery on. During the procedure, various portholes are inserted as well as a camera, which enables the surgeon to view the area on a screen and thus enable the reparative surgery to proceed.  This may include removing excess bone spurs (i.e. Cam), repairing torn labrum, removing loose bodies and so on. Hip arthroscopy is not a simple process and takes...

Seasons Greetings!

We would like to wish all our clients a Merry Christmas and a Happy, Healthy 2019 Christmas Opening Hours                                              Monday 24th – 9am to 1pm Tuesday 25th & Wednesday 26th – CLOSED                  Thursday 27th – 9am to 5pm Friday 28th – 9am to 5pm  Monday 31st – 9am to 5pm Tuesday 1st Jan – CLOSED                                                                                                               Open as usual from Wednesday 2nd January                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         ...

Inflammatory Backache – a diagnostic challenge!

Many people think of back pain being caused by poor posture, lifting badly or even just ‘wear and tear’. However, there is another group of patients who suffer from inflammatory backache. Although only a very small percentage of back pain sufferers have this, physiotherapists and chiropractors are trained to pick up possible tell-tale signs. This is important because the treatment approach is very different and, if caught early, can prevent more complications in later life.   Causes & Symptoms Inflammation of the pelvic and spinal joints can have many causes.  The most common is ankylosing spondylitis but it can be associated with psoriasis, bowel inflammation or even a recent infection anywhere in the body. Symptoms that may point to inflammatory back pain include: Suffered back pain for more than 3 months (known as ‘chronic’) Aged under 40 years Gradual onset of pain The pain and stiffness are improved with exercise No improvement with rest If you visit a practitioner such as a physiotherapist when you have back pain, they will take a detailed history, so it’s vital that you describe your pain and symptoms in full; this can help them to reach a diagnosis and, if necessary, make a referral to a rheumatologist for treatment of inflammatory back pain. Medication can help but rehabilitation and exercises to strengthen the back extensors and core muscles are also essential to obtain the best outcome possible.  If chronic back pain is troubling you, the physiotherapists at The Iveson Clinic can help so call us on 01787 374964 to book an appointment.   ...

Celebrating World Acupuncture Day

In celebration of World Acupuncture Day, we thought this graphic would be of interest to our followers. It shows some of the potential benefits of acupuncture. All the physiotherapists at The Iveson Clinic are members of the AACP (Acupuncture Association for Chartered Physiotherapists) and can include acupuncture within your treatment programme, to assist recovery and ease your pain. Call us on 01787 374964 for more information or to book an...

Keep On Running!

Sports Injuries & Trigger Point Acupuncture We are all being encouraged to get more active but, with increased activity, comes the risk of injuries and pain. Physiotherapy offers an integrated approach to sports injuries, combining acupuncture and manual therapy for the treatment of pain and inflammation, which will help get you up and running again. Acupuncture works by stimulating the body’s own chemical response which aids recovery and rehabilitation. Trigger point acupuncture (also known as dry needling) is becoming increasingly popular in the sporting world due to the rapid effect it has on pain arising from tense muscles and myofascial tissue. A trigger point is a hyper-sensitised area within a muscle, which is generally tender to touch and taut on palpation. The pain may be felt some distance from the trigger point. For example, the brachialis muscle in the upper arm can refer pain to the wrist. Studies have shown that needling deactivates the trigger point and enables the tense muscle to ease and lengthen. The physical act of needling into the myofascial or muscle tissue, and stimulating it by twisting the needle, stretches the tissue in relation to the surrounding areas. What does it feel like? Many people wonder – or even worry about – what this procedure feels like. As the needle is inserted, a slight momentary pin-prick sensation may be felt, followed by a deep ache, tingling or warmth. This is a positive response as it shows that the body’s pain relief mechanisms have been stimulated. There may also be a twitch response in the trigger point which indicates the needle is in the affected area.  Physiotherapists here...

Scars….More than just skin deep???

The resulting scar following surgery, injury or trauma can have significant consequences; far greater than what is seen on the superficial surface. Adhesions from the scar can form and attach to bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and even organs; this can then effect the function of these structures. Sensation can be lost or an area can become hypersensitive around the scar site, causing pain and aversion to touching the area or even having clothing touching the area. A scar that is puckered or red may well have developed these adhesions. Scar massage aims to improve circulation, flexibility and break down the adhesions to encourage the scar to function “normally”, resulting in a better appearance, reduction in pain and improved functioning of the scar and surrounding tissues. It takes 2 years for a scar to fully mature but even after this point scar massage can improve the situation. Here at The Iveson Clinic we offer scar massage, call today to book in your appointment on 01787 374964....