Do You Need a Knee Arthroscopy?

Developments in the Treatment of Degenerative Knee Arthritis & Meniscal Tears For many years knee arthroscopy has been used for patients with persistent knee pain, instability due to a torn meniscus, debridement (removal of loose bodies within the knee) and for diagnostic purposes. It was considered a good option as it was keyhole surgery, thus reducing the risk of infection and speeding up post-operative recovery. Previously arthroscopy was an open procedure, involving a larger incision and an elongated recovery period. However, recent clinical trials have studied patient recovery times and outcomes when treating degenerative meniscus tears with arthroscopy versus a combination of physiotherapy and exercise (Brignardello-Peterson, Guyatt BMJ 2017 – see link below for more details). The conclusion was that knee arthroscopy was not the most effective treatment. Also, a large trial in 2016 found there was no further benefit from arthroscopy compared to a programme of physiotherapy and exercise over a 12-month review period. Here at The Iveson Clinic, when a patient presents with an arthritic knee or cartilage degeneration, we would start with a detailed assessment and examination of the knee. We would also observe the patient’s general posture, particularly with regard to foot alignment. Findings are then discussed with the patient and a treatment plan is made. Advice includes avoiding kneeling, twisting on a stationary foot, squatting or any activity that aggravates the condition. If the knee is warm, swollen and inflamed, treatment is offered to aid recovery such as ice, acupuncture and soft tissue massage. The patient will also be offered a personalised, graduated exercise programme to strengthen the muscles supporting the knee joint. With compliance to the treatment and the home...

Dizziness

Do you suffer from a whirling, spinning or dizziness feeling? If so you are not alone, it is reported that up to 50% of adults will experience dizziness at some point. There are many causes for dizziness, one of these is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which is a condition of the inner ear. We can assess for this using the Hallpike-Dix test. This helps us to determine if your inner ear is the cause of the dizziness. If this is the case then the Epley Manoeuvre can be simply performed by our trained health professional. In most cases this quickly resolves the symptoms. Commonly, with BPPV, people will complain of dizziness when turning over in bed, looking up, looking down or laying down. This spinning feeling may be accompanied with nausea/vomiting and falling. Here at the Iveson Clinic we are proud to have health professionals fully trained in the assessment and treatment of BPPV. Call to make your appointment today on 01787...

Back To Health

As we all start to enjoy longer days and increased levels of activities, there is a tendency to overdo things and thus suffer with increased levels of back pain. The AACP (Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists), recommends the use of acupuncture as a treatment for patients with low back pain. Our physiotherapists at the Iveson Clinic, may often use this treatment in conjunction with ‘hand’s on’ treatment, advice and exercise.  Acupuncture treatment is especially cost effective when it is delivered by a physiotherapist as part of the management plan. Evidence concludes that acupuncture will assist in reducing low back pain. With less pain, back exercises can be engaged more rapidly. Acupuncture may also mean less analgesic medication is required. Acupuncture works by stimulating the brain and central nervous system to release natural pain relieving hormones , such as Endorphin.  The affects of acupuncture treatment can last up to six months and result in a reduction of pain and thus an improved quality of life....

A Warm Welcome to a New Colleague

We are pleased to welcome a new colleague to the Iveson Clinic team. Physiotherapist Laura Palmer joined us recently and will be working at the clinic on Tuesdays and Wednesdays, as well as offering home visits. Laura qualified as a Chartered Physiotherapist in 2007; she worked for the NHS for the first five years of her career, in different areas including elderly care, respiratory, neurology and musculoskeletal. Since then Laura has worked in a private practice, specialising in musculoskeletal problems and sports injuries. She is also qualified in acupuncture and aquatic physiotherapist and has a keen interest in knee injuries. When she is not busy working, Laura enjoys spending time with her husband and their young daughter....

I Like to Move It, Move It!

How active are you? Do you exercise regularly or do you feel you could do more? Physiotherapists recommend 30 minutes of exercise at a moderate intensity, five times a week. Don’t worry if you aren’t keen on joining a gym or exercise class though; it’s easier than you think to incorporate activity into your day. From vacuuming to walking to digging in the garden and dancing – anything that gets you moving and increases your heart rate counts! Take it gently at first and build up your pace and duration gradually. Don’t be tempted to overdo it. Walking: take a brisk walk for as long as you can – 30 minutes is a good target to work towards. Maybe get off the bus a stop or two early and walk to rest of the way Dancing: turn up your favourite tunes and dance around your home! At work: take the stairs instead of the lift and do some desk-based stretches and exercises Housework: turn chores into a workout by speeding them up or being more energetic. Try vacuuming or cleaning the bathroom with music on, to make it more enjoyable Physical activity makes us feel good, keeps us mobile and can help ward off illness, aches and pains. So get up, get out there and move it, move it!...

Ice, Ice, Baby!

With temperatures set to plummet this week, we may well see some ice and snow again. Slippery surfaces can be hazardous and many injuries are caused by falling or slipping on ice. However, with a little bit of preparation and care, accidents can hopefully be avoided. Here are some useful tips from the British Chiropractic Association to keep you safe & sound in the wintery weather: FOOTWEAR Wear waterproof shoes with thermal socks or insoles. This will help keep your feet warm. Cold, numb feet are less able to sense and adapt to changing conditions. Footwear should have a solid raised tread on the sole to maximise your grip. Or you can attach ‘ice grippers’ to your shoes, which have studs to help give a sure footing on the ice. Shoes or boots should be supportive, with firm ankle support to prevent you ‘going over’ on your ankle and help you feel more stable in slippery conditions.  If shoes have laces, they should be firmly laced to give a close fit without limiting the circulation. What to avoid: Wellingtons can be practical and keep your feet dry, but they often don’t give enough support and have poor grip. Also avoid walking outside in leather or other smooth-soled shoes. CLOTHING Clothing should be warm and allow you to move freely. Anything that impedes you from walking ‘normally’ could make you more prone to falling over or lead to you walking in an unnatural way. Layers will help keep you cosy Keep your extremities warm with a hat and gloves PREPARATION Build up your balance and stability at home by standing...