Celebrating World Acupuncture Day

In celebration of World Acupuncture Day, we thought this graphic would be of interest to our followers. It shows some of the potential benefits of acupuncture. All the physiotherapists at The Iveson Clinic are members of the AACP (Acupuncture Association for Chartered Physiotherapists) and can include acupuncture within your treatment programme, to assist recovery and ease your pain. Call us on 01787 374964 for more information or to book an...

Keep On Running!

Sports Injuries & Trigger Point Acupuncture We are all being encouraged to get more active but, with increased activity, comes the risk of injuries and pain. Physiotherapy offers an integrated approach to sports injuries, combining acupuncture and manual therapy for the treatment of pain and inflammation, which will help get you up and running again. Acupuncture works by stimulating the body’s own chemical response which aids recovery and rehabilitation. Trigger point acupuncture (also known as dry needling) is becoming increasingly popular in the sporting world due to the rapid effect it has on pain arising from tense muscles and myofascial tissue. A trigger point is a hyper-sensitised area within a muscle, which is generally tender to touch and taut on palpation. The pain may be felt some distance from the trigger point. For example, the brachialis muscle in the upper arm can refer pain to the wrist. Studies have shown that needling deactivates the trigger point and enables the tense muscle to ease and lengthen. The physical act of needling into the myofascial or muscle tissue, and stimulating it by twisting the needle, stretches the tissue in relation to the surrounding areas. What does it feel like? Many people wonder – or even worry about – what this procedure feels like. As the needle is inserted, a slight momentary pin-prick sensation may be felt, followed by a deep ache, tingling or warmth. This is a positive response as it shows that the body’s pain relief mechanisms have been stimulated. There may also be a twitch response in the trigger point which indicates the needle is in the affected area.  Physiotherapists here...

Scars….More than just skin deep???

The resulting scar following surgery, injury or trauma can have significant consequences; far greater than what is seen on the superficial surface. Adhesions from the scar can form and attach to bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and even organs; this can then effect the function of these structures. Sensation can be lost or an area can become hypersensitive around the scar site, causing pain and aversion to touching the area or even having clothing touching the area. A scar that is puckered or red may well have developed these adhesions. Scar massage aims to improve circulation, flexibility and break down the adhesions to encourage the scar to function “normally”, resulting in a better appearance, reduction in pain and improved functioning of the scar and surrounding tissues. It takes 2 years for a scar to fully mature but even after this point scar massage can improve the situation. Here at The Iveson Clinic we offer scar massage, call today to book in your appointment on 01787 374964....

Do You Need a Knee Arthroscopy?

Developments in the Treatment of Degenerative Knee Arthritis & Meniscal Tears For many years knee arthroscopy has been used for patients with persistent knee pain, instability due to a torn meniscus, debridement (removal of loose bodies within the knee) and for diagnostic purposes. It was considered a good option as it was keyhole surgery, thus reducing the risk of infection and speeding up post-operative recovery. Previously arthroscopy was an open procedure, involving a larger incision and an elongated recovery period. However, recent clinical trials have studied patient recovery times and outcomes when treating degenerative meniscus tears with arthroscopy versus a combination of physiotherapy and exercise (Brignardello-Peterson, Guyatt BMJ 2017 – see link below for more details). The conclusion was that knee arthroscopy was not the most effective treatment. Also, a large trial in 2016 found there was no further benefit from arthroscopy compared to a programme of physiotherapy and exercise over a 12-month review period. Here at The Iveson Clinic, when a patient presents with an arthritic knee or cartilage degeneration, we would start with a detailed assessment and examination of the knee. We would also observe the patient’s general posture, particularly with regard to foot alignment. Findings are then discussed with the patient and a treatment plan is made. Advice includes avoiding kneeling, twisting on a stationary foot, squatting or any activity that aggravates the condition. If the knee is warm, swollen and inflamed, treatment is offered to aid recovery such as ice, acupuncture and soft tissue massage. The patient will also be offered a personalised, graduated exercise programme to strengthen the muscles supporting the knee joint. With compliance to the treatment and the home...

Dizziness

Do you suffer from a whirling, spinning or dizziness feeling? If so you are not alone, it is reported that up to 50% of adults will experience dizziness at some point. There are many causes for dizziness, one of these is benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), which is a condition of the inner ear. We can assess for this using the Hallpike-Dix test. This helps us to determine if your inner ear is the cause of the dizziness. If this is the case then the Epley Manoeuvre can be simply performed by our trained health professional. In most cases this quickly resolves the symptoms. Commonly, with BPPV, people will complain of dizziness when turning over in bed, looking up, looking down or laying down. This spinning feeling may be accompanied with nausea/vomiting and falling. Here at the Iveson Clinic we are proud to have health professionals fully trained in the assessment and treatment of BPPV. Call to make your appointment today on 01787...

Back To Health

As we all start to enjoy longer days and increased levels of activities, there is a tendency to overdo things and thus suffer with increased levels of back pain. The AACP (Acupuncture Association of Chartered Physiotherapists), recommends the use of acupuncture as a treatment for patients with low back pain. Our physiotherapists at the Iveson Clinic, may often use this treatment in conjunction with ‘hand’s on’ treatment, advice and exercise.  Acupuncture treatment is especially cost effective when it is delivered by a physiotherapist as part of the management plan. Evidence concludes that acupuncture will assist in reducing low back pain. With less pain, back exercises can be engaged more rapidly. Acupuncture may also mean less analgesic medication is required. Acupuncture works by stimulating the brain and central nervous system to release natural pain relieving hormones , such as Endorphin.  The affects of acupuncture treatment can last up to six months and result in a reduction of pain and thus an improved quality of life....