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01787 374964 The Iveson Clinic for Physiotherapy and Chiropractic

Latest News

Here at the Iveson Clinic, we embrace the chance to share ongoing news and updates about developments in physiotherapy practice, key case studies, chiropractic treatments and articles of interest to share with our readers. Latest news from the Iveson Clinic, news about new staff and even occasional giveaways!

If you browse recent posts, there are some interesting blogs, such as “Hip Arthroscopy- a hot topic”, which discusses Andy Murray’s recent surgery. An article on dizziness outlines the different causes and tests and possible treatment options such as the Epley Manoeuvre. There are also articles on inflammatory backache, the most common form known as Ankylosing Spondylitis, and a further blog discusses knee arthroscopy or keyhole surgery to the knee. Recent research has found that treatment of degenerative arthritis of the knee combined with meniscal tears does just as well with physiotherapy and exercise as opposed to knee arthroscopy.

A blog on World Acupuncture Day discusses some potential benefits of acupuncture, with evidence regarding treatments for shoulder, tennis elbow, knee, back pain and headaches. A further article titled, “Keep on running”, discusses how trigger point needling is becoming increasingly popular in the sporting world due to the rapid effect it has on pain arising from tense muscles and myofascial tissue.

Latest news also comments on topical issue related to the time of year, such as early spring and everyone getting out in the garden, to winter time and slipping over on the ice!

If you find our latest news blogs of interest, why not like the Iveson Clinic on Facebook, where articles are regularly available, as well as occasional giveaway promotions.

(Physiotherapists and Chiropractors have to undertake a certain number of hours CPD training each year to stay abreast of current developments and evidence based treatments.)

Frozen Shoulder, Hydrodilatation…..a sticky problem!

What is a frozen shoulder ?   Frozen shoulder causes noticeable pain and stiffness in the shoulder which can make it very difficult to move. Sometimes patients present to the Iveson Clinic saying they have a frozen shoulder, and then promptly move their arm above their head! Hence a diagnosis that is sometimes used too freely! Approximately only about 3 in about a 100 people will have a true frozen shoulder in their lifetime. A true frozen shoulder results in adhesions developing around the shoulder capsule, thus making movement of the arm very difficult. ( Also know as Adhesive Capsulitis) Frozen shoulder goes through three phases of injury: Freezing phase Frozen phase Thawing phase   What causes frozen shoulder?   There are various causes of this condition. These may include: after a fall following a neck and shoulder injury repetitive strain such as painting or chopping wood after surgery whilst keeping the shoulder fairly still to avoid stretching or pulling the scar tissue diabetes can be linked to the problem but also frozen shoulder can sometimes occur with no cause at all!  The recovery is slow and on average can take one to two years to recover.    Treatments available Previously, physiotherapy, painkillers, acupuncture, steroid injections or possibly surgery have been the only options of treatment options for this painful condition. More recently, hydrodilatation injections have been of some help to patients. Hydrodilatation injections This involves injecting a large volume of fluid into the shoulder joint which expands the shoulder capsule and breaks down the adhesions.  Hydrodilatation is performed under Ultrasound guidance. Physiotherapy is then important which combines exercises...

Could your Hip Pain be Sacroiliac Joint Pain?

Sacroiliac Joint Pain When is Hip Pain not Hip Pain? Pain in the hip area is one of the most common symptoms presented by clients to chiropractic or physiotherapy clinics. However, all may not be as it seems. Hip pain may not be caused by the hips at all; it may actually be coming from the sacroiliac joints. The hip joints are the ball and socket joints at the side of the hip area; the sacroiliac joints are located at the two dimples low down to either side of the spine. They are L-shaped joints, surrounded by supporting muscle and ligaments, which are the link between the spine and the pelvis. The joints should move just a small amount to allow for walking and sitting.  The sacroiliac joints can become injured or inflamed through trauma or strain, especially through prolonged sitting. Pain is usually felt to one side of the lower back, into the buttocks and sometimes to the groin and front of the thigh. For these reasons, it can be confused with hip or sciatic nerve issues. When you have sacroiliac joint pain, it may be aggravated by standing still, walking, sitting cross-legged and lying on your side. Bending forward, stair climbing, hill climbing and rising from a seated position can also provoke sacroiliac pain.  Depending on the nature and severity of the problem, the chiropractic or physiotherapy approach is usually to restore function and mobility to the joint, reduce inflammation and work with the muscles and ligaments to reduce pain. Exercises will help to rehabilitate the joint and sometimes a special support belt can be of benefit. (These can be purchased from The Iveson Clinic.) Our...
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