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01787 374964 The Iveson Clinic for Physiotherapy and Chiropractic

Latest News

Here at the Iveson Clinic, we embrace the chance to share ongoing news and updates about developments in physiotherapy practice, key case studies, chiropractic treatments and articles of interest to share with our readers. Latest news from the Iveson Clinic, news about new staff and even occasional giveaways!

If you browse recent posts, there are some interesting blogs, such as “Hip Arthroscopy- a hot topic”, which discusses Andy Murray’s recent surgery. An article on dizziness outlines the different causes and tests and possible treatment options such as the Epley Manoeuvre. There are also articles on inflammatory backache, the most common form known as Ankylosing Spondylitis, and a further blog discusses knee arthroscopy or keyhole surgery to the knee. Recent research has found that treatment of degenerative arthritis of the knee combined with meniscal tears does just as well with physiotherapy and exercise as opposed to knee arthroscopy.

A blog on World Acupuncture Day discusses some potential benefits of acupuncture, with evidence regarding treatments for shoulder, tennis elbow, knee, back pain and headaches. A further article titled, “Keep on running”, discusses how trigger point needling is becoming increasingly popular in the sporting world due to the rapid effect it has on pain arising from tense muscles and myofascial tissue.

Latest news also comments on topical issue related to the time of year, such as early spring and everyone getting out in the garden, to winter time and slipping over on the ice!

If you find our latest news blogs of interest, why not like the Iveson Clinic on Facebook, where articles are regularly available, as well as occasional giveaway promotions.

(Physiotherapists and Chiropractors have to undertake a certain number of hours CPD training each year to stay abreast of current developments and evidence based treatments.)

Frozen Shoulder, Hydrodilatation…..a sticky problem!

What is a frozen shoulder ?   Frozen shoulder causes noticeable pain and stiffness in the shoulder which can make it very difficult to move. Sometimes patients present to the Iveson Clinic saying they have a frozen shoulder, and then promptly move their arm above their head! Hence a diagnosis that is sometimes used too freely! Approximately only about 3 in about a 100 people will have a true frozen shoulder in their lifetime. A true frozen shoulder results in adhesions developing around the shoulder capsule, thus making movement of the arm very difficult. ( Also know as Adhesive Capsulitis) Frozen shoulder goes through three phases of injury: Freezing phase Frozen phase Thawing phase   What causes frozen shoulder?   There are various causes of this condition. These may include: after a fall following a neck and shoulder injury repetitive strain such as painting or chopping wood after surgery whilst keeping the shoulder fairly still to avoid stretching or pulling the scar tissue diabetes can be linked to the problem but also frozen shoulder can sometimes occur with no cause at all!  The recovery is slow and on average can take one to two years to recover.    Treatments available Previously, physiotherapy, painkillers, acupuncture, steroid injections or possibly surgery have been the only options of treatment options for this painful condition. More recently, hydrodilatation injections have been of some help to patients. Hydrodilatation injections This involves injecting a large volume of fluid into the shoulder joint which expands the shoulder capsule and breaks down the adhesions.  Hydrodilatation is performed under Ultrasound guidance. Physiotherapy is then important which combines exercises...

Could your Hip Pain be Sacroiliac Joint Pain?

Sacroiliac Joint Pain When is Hip Pain not Hip Pain? Pain in the hip area is one of the most common symptoms presented by clients to chiropractic or physiotherapy clinics. However, all may not be as it seems. Hip pain may not be caused by the hips at all; it may actually be coming from the sacroiliac joints. The hip joints are the ball and socket joints at the side of the hip area; the sacroiliac joints are located at the two dimples low down to either side of the spine. They are L-shaped joints, surrounded by supporting muscle and ligaments, which are the link between the spine and the pelvis. The joints should move just a small amount to allow for walking and sitting.  The sacroiliac joints can become injured or inflamed through trauma or strain, especially through prolonged sitting. Pain is usually felt to one side of the lower back, into the buttocks and sometimes to the groin and front of the thigh. For these reasons, it can be confused with hip or sciatic nerve issues. When you have sacroiliac joint pain, it may be aggravated by standing still, walking, sitting cross-legged and lying on your side. Bending forward, stair climbing, hill climbing and rising from a seated position can also provoke sacroiliac pain.  Depending on the nature and severity of the problem, the chiropractic or physiotherapy approach is usually to restore function and mobility to the joint, reduce inflammation and work with the muscles and ligaments to reduce pain. Exercises will help to rehabilitate the joint and sometimes a special support belt can be of benefit. (These can be purchased from The Iveson Clinic.) Our...

Hip Arthroscopy… A Hot Topic

  Since the news of Andy Murray’s forthcoming retirement, and the revelation that he hasn’t made a full and pain-free recovery from his hip surgery, we felt it would be helpful to explain a little about the procedure he underwent – the hip arthroscopy. This topic is of particular interest to Julie Iveson, head physiotherapist and proprietor of The Iveson Clinic, who used to be an international gymnast underwent the same operation on her hips, five and eight years ago. Hip arthroscopy is generally considered for patients below the age of 40 who have damaged their hip joint and possibly the soft tissue around and within it. This damage often occurs in elite athletes whose hips can be affected by repetitive physical exercise over a long period of time.  The hip joint is a ball and socket joint, held tightly together by muscles, ligaments and suction. Hip arthroscopy is commonly performed for a condition called Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI), where there may be some catching or pinching of the ball and socket joint due to additional bone which can develop on the ball or the rim of the socket which is termed Cam or Pincer impingement.  Due to its deep-seated nature within the body, the hip is not the easiest joint to perform keyhole surgery on. During the procedure, various portholes are inserted as well as a camera, which enables the surgeon to view the area on a screen and thus enable the reparative surgery to proceed.  This may include removing excess bone spurs (i.e. Cam), repairing torn labrum, removing loose bodies and so on. Hip arthroscopy is not a simple process and takes...

Seasons Greetings!

We would like to wish all our clients a Merry Christmas and a Happy, Healthy 2019 Christmas Opening Hours                                              Monday 24th – 9am to 1pm Tuesday 25th & Wednesday 26th – CLOSED                  Thursday 27th – 9am to 5pm Friday 28th – 9am to 5pm  Monday 31st – 9am to 5pm Tuesday 1st Jan – CLOSED                                                                                                               Open as usual from Wednesday 2nd January                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         ...

Inflammatory Backache – a diagnostic challenge!

Many people think of back pain being caused by poor posture, lifting badly or even just ‘wear and tear’. However, there is another group of patients who suffer from inflammatory backache. Although only a very small percentage of back pain sufferers have this, physiotherapists and chiropractors are trained to pick up possible tell-tale signs. This is important because the treatment approach is very different and, if caught early, can prevent more complications in later life.   Causes & Symptoms Inflammation of the pelvic and spinal joints can have many causes.  The most common is ankylosing spondylitis but it can be associated with psoriasis, bowel inflammation or even a recent infection anywhere in the body. Symptoms that may point to inflammatory back pain include: Suffered back pain for more than 3 months (known as ‘chronic’) Aged under 40 years Gradual onset of pain The pain and stiffness are improved with exercise No improvement with rest If you visit a practitioner such as a physiotherapist when you have back pain, they will take a detailed history, so it’s vital that you describe your pain and symptoms in full; this can help them to reach a diagnosis and, if necessary, make a referral to a rheumatologist for treatment of inflammatory back pain. Medication can help but rehabilitation and exercises to strengthen the back extensors and core muscles are also essential to obtain the best outcome possible.  If chronic back pain is troubling you, the physiotherapists at The Iveson Clinic can help so call us on 01787 374964 to book an appointment.   ...

Celebrating World Acupuncture Day

In celebration of World Acupuncture Day, we thought this graphic would be of interest to our followers. It shows some of the potential benefits of acupuncture. All the physiotherapists at The Iveson Clinic are members of the AACP (Acupuncture Association for Chartered Physiotherapists) and can include acupuncture within your treatment programme, to assist recovery and ease your pain. Call us on 01787 374964 for more information or to book an...

My Back Pain Has Gone – Now What?

Non-specific low back pain is one of the most common – and costly – healthcare problems in this country. This type of back pain typically recurs and has a huge impact on individual sufferers through time off work, poor sleep, reduced physical activity, increased use of pain medication, and on society as a whole through lost work days, GP appointments and so on. Chiropractors generally treat low back pain with gentle spinal manipulation and mobilisation techniques, backed up with the use of exercises. Many studies show that, for many people, this is the most effective approach. However, non-specific low back pain is a complex, multi-faceted problem, which encompasses social, behavioural and psychological factors, and there is little evidence about how best to prevent the pain from returning.  Many chiropractors use one of two strategies once a patient has recovered from their low back pain: to finish treatment and possibly continue with exercises, and only have further treatment when the pain returns (this is known as symptom-guided treatment) or to go on to a maintenance care programme. This involves regular treatment sessions at three, four or even six-monthly intervals to remove any areas of spinal dysfunction as they are found and before they become symptomatic. This is a common approach used by chiropractors and one which, anecdotally, seems to work for many people, although there has been no quality research on it until now. A recent Swedish study looked at a group of over 300 patients with non-specific low back pain who responded well to chiropractic care. They were then either left to return for treatment if and when their pain returned, or they...

Keep On Running!

Sports Injuries & Trigger Point Acupuncture We are all being encouraged to get more active but, with increased activity, comes the risk of injuries and pain. Physiotherapy offers an integrated approach to sports injuries, combining acupuncture and manual therapy for the treatment of pain and inflammation, which will help get you up and running again. Acupuncture works by stimulating the body’s own chemical response which aids recovery and rehabilitation. Trigger point acupuncture (also known as dry needling) is becoming increasingly popular in the sporting world due to the rapid effect it has on pain arising from tense muscles and myofascial tissue. A trigger point is a hyper-sensitised area within a muscle, which is generally tender to touch and taut on palpation. The pain may be felt some distance from the trigger point. For example, the brachialis muscle in the upper arm can refer pain to the wrist. Studies have shown that needling deactivates the trigger point and enables the tense muscle to ease and lengthen. The physical act of needling into the myofascial or muscle tissue, and stimulating it by twisting the needle, stretches the tissue in relation to the surrounding areas. What does it feel like? Many people wonder – or even worry about – what this procedure feels like. As the needle is inserted, a slight momentary pin-prick sensation may be felt, followed by a deep ache, tingling or warmth. This is a positive response as it shows that the body’s pain relief mechanisms have been stimulated. There may also be a twitch response in the trigger point which indicates the needle is in the affected area.  Physiotherapists here...

Scars….More than just skin deep???

The resulting scar following surgery, injury or trauma can have significant consequences; far greater than what is seen on the superficial surface. Adhesions from the scar can form and attach to bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons and even organs; this can then effect the function of these structures. Sensation can be lost or an area can become hypersensitive around the scar site, causing pain and aversion to touching the area or even having clothing touching the area. A scar that is puckered or red may well have developed these adhesions. Scar massage aims to improve circulation, flexibility and break down the adhesions to encourage the scar to function “normally”, resulting in a better appearance, reduction in pain and improved functioning of the scar and surrounding tissues. It takes 2 years for a scar to fully mature but even after this point scar massage can improve the situation. Here at The Iveson Clinic we offer scar massage, call today to book in your appointment on 01787 374964....

The Iveson Clinic – * Autumn Giveaway *

              In celebration of approaching our 5000th patient, we are delighted to offer this Autumnal Giveaway. The Iveson Clinic is based in Long Melford, offering Physiotherapy , Chiropractic and Acupuncture treatment, by widely experienced practitioners.  Our giveaway, which is worth £45 , includes: Kinesiology tape, Ice Pack, Wheat Pack, Candle, £10 Gift Voucher, Pen and Credit card cover To be in with a chance of winning this prize: Like and comment on this post on our Facebook page Like The Iveson Clinic Facebook page  and even better, share it with your friends.  Once we have reached 200 likes, we will draw the lucky winner and the name will be posted on our Facebook page. Good luck !...
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